Discovering a Visual Shorthand: The Making of The Cartographer’s Dilemma

continued from part 1

A Series Of Dilemmas

“Cartographers use an illustrative short-hand to describe geographical features of the real world. This short-hand form of communication is designed to allow the viewer to have an easy baring on the contours and layout of the area depicted on the cartographer’s map. Exaggerated color palettes, lines of various weight and solid fields of color all act as simplified yet concise forms of communication informing the map viewer of the geography depicted. Instead of focusing on the actual details of the full terrain, the user of the map can rely solely on the map to find her way around the area.
“Spoken and written language serves as a way to describe the real world as well. Words are used as a concise method to describe all the vast facets and features of the world and the ways in which we interact with and within it.
“However, are words also just another form of short-hand, simplifying or exaggerating how we see the real word? A culture’s vocabulary has such a huge impact on how it’s members regard the world in which they live. Could it be that the more complex and sophisticated our lexicon becomes, the more removed we are from simply seeing the real world?”

– as described on suboken.com

The ideas and dilemmas philosophy introduced me to were the perfect concepts for me to explore through my art. Creating art wasn’t about making a thing, it was about exploring an idea. Visual art in particular become a new voice through which I could explore the world. During the process of building The Cartographer’s Dilemma (TCD), the individual elements became metaphors of the different aspects of the theme I was tackling. With regard to the completed piece, the more refined the artwork was aesthetically, the clearer the question posed by the artwork’s concept became.

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There’s A Man Down, In A Place!

This past weekend, Calista and I went out to capture a few new images for In A Place. Little did we know just what sort of experience the weekend had in store for us.

Over the past two months, I’ve been testing the new camera, taking updated and new In A Place photos. Part of this process was about comparing some of my older lenses and lens attachments with the new camera. My excitement was centered on the large increase in megapixels the model has compared to my older camera. Outside my never ending curiosity in exploring the IAP concept, there’s a new development for the project that calls for new images, a development that will be detailed in a future post.

In_A_PlaceThe first location we visited was Big Bear, California. The days were sunny and the snow was clean. I had shot in the snow a couple times before, Mammoth Lakes and Mt. San Jacinto, but wasn’t very excited with how the images turned out. I think only one of those images ended up in the art book. With the new camera, I was determined to land some better shots.

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