Return of The Osteodontokeratic Hammer

In college, I would often incorporate the subject matter of my science and humanities courses into the concepts for my artwork. Philosophy wound up being the perfect muse for my creativity. However, other fields of study such as astronomy, biology and anthropology offered great topics to help enhance the thematic focus of my projects.

It happened by coincidence that my 3D Design instructor assigned a project for us to realize a common object made from an unassociated material the same week my physical anthropology class was learning about Raymond Dart and his theorized Osteodontokeratic tool culture. My imagination ignited in wondering what a common everyday tool would look like if the materials used in its manufacturing were restricted to bone, tooth and horn. Having a background in special effects make-up, I had a fairly clear idea how to pull off the sculpture and make it look like a living object. After a few days of sketching out the design, I went to work sculpting a hammer that appeared to be grown from flesh.

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